Renee Jones (NBC)

Playing Lexie Brooks Carver over the years has certainly had its share of ups and downs for actress Renee Jones. After taping the 4th of July episode for Days of Our Lives, where she “oohed” and “ahhed” over fake fireworks, the very friendly and open actress took some time to talk with me about the rollercoaster ride her character has taken her on.

Playing Lexie on Days since 1993, Renee’s job security was called into question when she was let go and rehired twice over the last year and a half. “When it first happened it shocked me,” she recalled. “I didn’t think it would be that hard to leave, but let me tell you, I bawled. I cried like a baby. As soon as they started rolling the cake out, the tears just started!”

When she was brought back and then let go for a second time, Renee had a different reaction. “I just got mad,” she laughed. So when the powers that be admitted they made a mistake and asked her to return yet again, Renee put her ego aside and agreed to step back into Lexie’s shoes. Coming back with a different attitude, Renee says she’s never been happier at Days, stating, “I’ve been having the best time since I’ve been there this last time around. I don’t take it so seriously anymore. It’s not life or death.”

With her current storyline amping up, it doesn’t look like Renee or Lexie is going anywhere anytime soon. But just what is up with the bickering Carvers? “It’s like reality. It’s what happens. [Abe and Lexie] have been married a long time,” Renee explained and then marveled, “You know, first off, I’m telling you, Abe is like a saint to take Lexie back. This is the third time, and even after she’s been like, ‘I’m pregnant and I think it’s your son’s baby.’ I’m mean come on!”

It looks like the couple will have even more to disagree about though, as in the next couple of weeks, the Carvers will learn their son Theo is autistic, and according to the actress, Abe will go into denial about the situation. Adding an element of realism, Renee shared, “I’ve been told they’re going to play it well. I believe one of the writers has a child who has autism.”